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    CD Designs Blog

    Sustainable drainage systems (SUDS)

    Aco drainage system at the foot of the driveway which runs to a sump

    Aco drainage system at the foot of the driveway which runs to a sump

    Ever since 1 October 2008 new rules have applied for householders wanting to hard surface over their front gardens. If the surface to be covered is more than five square metres, you will need planning permission for laying traditional, impermeable driveways that do not control rainwater running off onto roads. This will apply to new driveways, drive extensions or drive replacements. You will NOT need planning permission if the surface to be covered is less than five square metres or if the new surface is permeable or porous or if a traditional surface is laid and the rainwater is directed to a lawn or border to drain naturally or if it is directed to a soakaway via a drainage channel. An estimated 70% of existing driveways already drain in a sustainable way.

    From October 2008 we have advised customers to incorporate sustainable drainage into their pattern imprinted concrete projects to adhere to Sustainable drainage systems (SUDS) if their scheme doesn’t already conform with the SUDS protocol.

    This may be in the form of Aco drainage that flows into a sump or natural soakaway in the form of a border but there are other products which already conform to SUDS can be Resin bound aggregates and permeable block paving systems which are part of our range at Complete Driveway Designs.

    Best Blogs of 2013

    Once again we have looked over our blog entries for the last 12 months, and picked out our favourite 5 for you. Click on the headlines to read the full articles.

    1. Movers and Shakers

    Mover & Shaker

    From January. To coincide with our move to our new offices in Ramsbottom, we were awarded with bestofbury’s ‘Movers and Shakers’ award.

    2. All-Weather Landscaping

    From April. We braved a March snowstorm to do some landscaping work in Bowden, Manchester.

    3. Spring Maintenance

    bloom3

    Another one from April. Although Spring is a while away, it’s worth revisiting this blog about what to do if the Winter weather has taken its toll on your driveway.

    4. Case Study – Hollywell, Wales

    Pattern Imprinted Concrete Driveway, Holywell

    From June. Our favourite and largest case study of the year was this pattern imprinted concrete driveway and patio in Hollywell, Wales.

    5. Caxton Gibbet McDonald’s

    Caxton Gibbet 1900

    From October. This Halloween themed blog entry tells of a McDonald’s drive-thru we installed in Caxton in September, and of the gruesome history of its location.

    If you liked these, you may also want to check out our list of best blogs from 2012.

    Case Study – Queens Street, Padiham

    Padiham Pattern Imprinted Concrete

    Pattern imprinted concrete yard in Padiham

    This project was installed in September of this year. Originally a small space, this back yard was transformed into a more open and usable space using pattern imprinted concrete.

    Before the concrete was installed, a retaining wall was removed from the area and four steps were installed for access. The customer had previously had trouble with water seeping into his basement, so provisions were made for any water to run away from the house and into an aco channel which sat in front of the lowest step. An extra gully was also fitted to alleviate excess water from the roof of the outhouse.

    The pattern used for this yard is London Cobble, and the colour is Arizona Tan. As you can see from the above picture, even a relatively small space can be transformed into an attractive and functional part of the home.

    To see the full case study, with lots more pictures, click here.

    Caxton Gibbet McDonald’s

    Initial preparation for the concrete, with our van and the gibbet in the background

    Initial preparation, with our van and the gibbet in the background

    With Halloween coming up, we thought we would tell you about an installation we did last month near Caxton, and of the gruesome legends that are associated with it.

    Caxton is a small village 9 miles west of Cambridge. It is best known for being the site of an infamous gibbet. A gibbet is any instrument of public execution, but the term gibbeting, which Caxton is known for, refers to the use of a gallows-type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of executed criminals were hung on public display. There are tales of people being gibbeted in Caxton in the 1670’s, and there are court case records of the gibbet still being there in 1745.

    There are many tales of the people that have died on the gibbet, the most famous involving the robbery and murder of a family named Partridge. The murderer escaped abroad, but returned some years later. Whilst in a local pub, the inebriated man boasted how he fled authorities after poaching some partridges. The pub’s landlord thought he was referring to the murders and called the police. He was arrested and later sentenced to be hung from a cage on the gibbet till he starved to death. A variation on the story tells how a local baker took pity on the caged man and gave him some bread, for which he was arrested and sentenced to the same fate.

    The gibbet in a photo from 1900

    The photo of the gibbet circa 1900

    The current gibbet is a replica, thought to have been constructed from the timbers of a nearby cottage, and is seen in the photo above from around 1900. It stands at a crossroads about a mile and a half from Caxton, and is right next to the site of a new McDonald’s restaurant. Complete Driveway Designs were commisioned to install the pattern imprinted concrete for the drive-thru, based on similar work we have done in other parts of the country.

    Click the link below to see the Wikipedia article on Caxton Gibbet, which includes a reference to the new restaurant.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caxton_Gibbet

    Work Begins On Showroom

    When we moved to our new premises in December, we told you about our plans to build a showroom. Work has now begun, and it’s already looking great!

    Inprinting the pattern

    The process has not been dissimilar to the way we install pattern imprinted concrete for our customers. We started by stripping out all the existing storage shelves that were here when we moved in, and then got rid of all other the debris that had accumulated. The floor was then prepared for concrete in the usual way, by digging up and levelling the area, then setting up temporary barriers to contain the concrete and let us know how high to pour it. The concrete was then poured, coloured and the pattern was imprinted, as you can see in the image above.

    Building the interior walls

    Building the interior walls

    Work on the interior walls has just begun (above), and as with all our work, is being done by our own people. We don’t sub-contract, so when the showroom is finished, you will know exactly what our work looks like. When the work is completed you will be able to see and stand on a pattern imprinted concrete floor, just like we install on our driveways, and also view a wide variety of pattern and colour samples. We will announce when the room is ready, so please come and see us then!

    Complete Driveway Designs Ltd

    The Yard, Stubbins Lane, Ramsbottom, BL0 0PT
    E:info@northwest-driveways.co.uk
    T: 01706 827180

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