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    CD Designs Blog

    Caxton Gibbet McDonald’s

    Initial preparation for the concrete, with our van and the gibbet in the background

    Initial preparation, with our van and the gibbet in the background

    With Halloween coming up, we thought we would tell you about an installation we did last month near Caxton, and of the gruesome legends that are associated with it.

    Caxton is a small village 9 miles west of Cambridge. It is best known for being the site of an infamous gibbet. A gibbet is any instrument of public execution, but the term gibbeting, which Caxton is known for, refers to the use of a gallows-type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of executed criminals were hung on public display. There are tales of people being gibbeted in Caxton in the 1670’s, and there are court case records of the gibbet still being there in 1745.

    There are many tales of the people that have died on the gibbet, the most famous involving the robbery and murder of a family named Partridge. The murderer escaped abroad, but returned some years later. Whilst in a local pub, the inebriated man boasted how he fled authorities after poaching some partridges. The pub’s landlord thought he was referring to the murders and called the police. He was arrested and later sentenced to be hung from a cage on the gibbet till he starved to death. A variation on the story tells how a local baker took pity on the caged man and gave him some bread, for which he was arrested and sentenced to the same fate.

    The gibbet in a photo from 1900

    The photo of the gibbet circa 1900

    The current gibbet is a replica, thought to have been constructed from the timbers of a nearby cottage, and is seen in the photo above from around 1900. It stands at a crossroads about a mile and a half from Caxton, and is right next to the site of a new McDonald’s restaurant. Complete Driveway Designs were commisioned to install the pattern imprinted concrete for the drive-thru, based on similar work we have done in other parts of the country.

    Click the link below to see the Wikipedia article on Caxton Gibbet, which includes a reference to the new restaurant.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caxton_Gibbet

    Case Study – Blueberry Road, Bowdon

    The finished patio and landscaped garden

    The finished patio and landscaped garden

    The Bowdon project was installed in March of this year. We originally posted a time-lapse video of the landscaping that we did, and whilst we were there we also installed pattern imprinted concrete both at the front and rear of the property.

    The size of the project was immense, measuring a vast 300m2 area. The colour varied from the back, which was laid with cream, to the front, which was laid in Classic Grey. The pattern also varied from the front to the back. For the landscaping part of the job, the turf was laid with decorative stone borders. A pond was also built in the corner for the customer, who is an avid fish lover.

    Too see the full case study of this installation click here.

    Concrete Garden Walls

    Example of a natural looking wall made from concrete

    Example of a natural looking wall made from concrete

    When thinking about separating your garden from the outside world, most people automatically think of wooden fencing. Following on from our look at the recent phenomenon of concrete furniture, the latest trend in garden design is concrete walling.

    There are many benefits to having a concrete wall over traditional wood fencing. Firstly a concrete wall will never rot or warp like wood fencing, meaning the larger initial install cost will be paid back over time. The concrete wall will obviously fare much better against the elements and is fire and wind proof.

    However the main reason customers are turning to concrete walls is the huge variety of colours and patterns that can be applied, making them not just functional but decorative as well. As with our pattern imprinted driveways, the concrete can be matched or contrasted with the design of the house and garden, and the style is only limited by your imagination. It can also be made to look like wood, stone or any other material, whilst keeping the inherent strength and longevity of concrete. Finally planters can easily be incorporated into the walls, giving a very organic and natural look to your garden.

    If you would like a quote on any fencing or walling, please make an enquiry here, or call 01706 82 7180.

    Concrete Furnishings

    A concrete couch designed by

    A concrete couch designed by Tina Rugelj (www.tinarugelj.com)

    In the mid-20th century, concrete became unfashionable due to its extensive use on large housing projects and tower blocks. However, new techniques and imaginitive designers are giving the material a new lease of life.

    Souda, a New York City-based design studio, has been experimenting with all kinds of concrete structures, including furniture. “In a lot of design, concrete is still used in a blocky way. But it is a fluid material from which we can now make any sort of three-dimensional shape,” said Isaac Friedman-Heiman, one of the co-founders of the company. Traditionally concrete is mixed with gravel and sand, but high-tech materials like fibreglass and steel-reinforced microfibres have allowed the designers to create almost anything they can imagine.

    Concrete seater designed by Tina Gru

    Concrete seater designed by Tina Rugelj (www.tinarugelj.com)

    Tina Rugelj, a Slovenian architect, has been researching concrete furniture techniques for several years. Her collection of fibre-reinforced concrete outdoor furniture was presented in Milan last year. “While designing this collection, I wanted to use all of the potential of the material: its extreme thinness (the thickness of my product varies between 10mm and 16mm); lightness (from 9kg to 56kg); the way it can bend; and its weather resistance, both to cold and to heat.”The techniques used are still largely experimental, but as designers gain more experience with the material, we may see it becoming a large part of our home furnishings in the future.

    See the original article from ft.com here.

    Case Study, Oakwood Drive, Bolton

    Oakwood Drive

    Colour - Steadman Buff, Pattern - Ashlar Slate

    This particular customer approached a former customer for our details after being impressed by our work, which you can see here. The customer wanted a transformation of both the back and the front of their property, with a new pattern imprinted driveway and patio.

    Steps were built to the rear of the property to provide access to a lower garden area, and a half square step was installed providing access to the back door. Both sets of steps were formed using charcoal KL blocks. A wall was built at the front of the property using Marshallite buff block, providing a planting area, and the front wall repointed and given a facelift. The walls were then topped with coping stones. When deciding on the pattern and colour of the pattern imprinted concrete the, customer chose Steadman Buff and the Ashlar Slate pattern.

    To see the full case study for this pattern imprinted concrete driveway, please click here.

    Complete Driveway Designs Ltd

    The Yard, Stubbins Lane, Ramsbottom, BL0 0PT
    E:info@northwest-driveways.co.uk
    T: 01706 827180

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